culture
matters

at Somerville, we believe it’s our role to realize and enhance the vision you have for your building

After all, no one knows your business and goals better than you do. Our job is to listen, to ask the right questions, to understand your challenges—and to respond with inspired ideas that exceed your highest expectations. Remembering our work will long outlive us, we approach our profession with reverence and dedication.

OUR VISION

to be regarded by our clients as an integral partner in achieving success.

OUR MISSION

to establish long-term relationships with:
our clients by setting the highest standards for the architecture and engineering professions.
our employees through progressive management and generous rewards for performance and loyalty.

PHILOSOPHY

Without question, a building has the power to draw the eye and stir the soul. But a truly well-designed building can do so much more. It can solve challenges. It can open possibilities. It can improve the lives of all who enter it. A well-designed building doesn’t merely allow those inside it to do what they do. It helps them do what they do better. More efficiently. More effectively. These are the type of buildings that Somerville creates. We do this by asking the right questions, paying careful attention to the answers and responding with thoughtful solutions. We feel that buildings aren’t so much built with bricks, metal, and glass, but with listening, experience and imagination. We believe that a building’s true beauty lies in the thinking that goes into it. Every detail, every decision at every step along the way – it all counts in the final design. And if there’s one thing we know at Somerville, it’s that design matters.SM

history

1940s

The story of Somerville Architects and Engineers begins with a call to war, World War II, where John E. Somerville was put to task on war plant design and construction.  His facility experience in both engineering and architectural disciplines spanned the United States. This and his pre-war experience with another local architectural firm led to the opening of his own practice at 230 E. Walnut St., Green Bay, Wisconsin in May of 1946. As Frankie Carle and his Orchestra played “Oh! What It Seemed to Be,” the new focus seemed to be on industry. And with that, Somerville started its project log with the Great Lakes Shoe Company of Oconto, Wisconsin. 

1950s

Through the 1950s Somerville gained a foothold in the industrial market and was commissioned to design the Green Bay Box Company’s plant on Doblin St. and Paper Converting’s initial office and plant on South Ashland St.  In 1955, Somerville was retained by the City of Green Bay to design City Stadium, now Lambeau Field.  And by 1959 the Veteran’s Memorial Arena was added to their portfolio.

1960s

The ’60s started off with Elvis Presley and “It’s Now or Never” atop the billboard charts.  Post World War II, the nation saw an increased need for domestic production capacity.  This trend attributed to the firm’s share of industrial projects, at nearly 75% of the total workload.  Some notable clients of the time were UW Oshkosh, Green Bay Tissue Mills, Bellin Memorial Hospital, and Green Bay Schools.  This decade also saw the addition of John Somerville’s son, Jack, to the firm.

1970s

During the ’70s the client base doubled with the addition of new clients and continued loyalty from existing clients.  January 1, 1973, the firm moved into the 2020 Riverside Drive building, which was one of Somerville’s own real estate developments.  Twenty-two days later, US President Richard Nixon announced “peace with honour” in Vietnam.  This decade also saw the introduction of a very noisy computer console in Somerville’s office which had a room of its own. 

1980s

The early 1980s brought about a significant organizational change. Dick Griese became president and John E. Somerville became Chairman of the Board. The ’80s also saw the formation of the Mill Division which was established to serve Somerville’s growing list of industrial clients. The number of commissions in this decade was over 1,200 – compared to that of 355 in the ’60s and 725 in the ’70s. Overall Somerville’s practice had now become very broad, having a diverse portfolio designing many kinds of buildings.  It was also during this time that Somerville adapted CADD and virtually all working drawings were CADD printouts by the end of the ’80s.

1990s

As Guns n’ “Roses Sweet Child O’ Mine” topped the charts entering the ’90s, it was then that John E. Somerville entered into retirement and his son, John “Jack” Somerville became president of the firm. The 1990s brought the sharpest growth in both commissions and staff in the firm’s history. This growth compelled Somerville’s leadership to seek larger quarters, and so the firm moved just a few hundred feet south of the 2020 location to our current office at 2100 Riverside Drive.  Work through the ’90s remained strong in healthcare facilities and industrial design.

2000s

The events on September 11, 2001 shook our nation and the 2007/2008 recession brought difficult times for much of our industry. However, Somerville’s strong client relationships remained whole and the firm’s workload continued to grow. Our list of education clients and projects grew rapidly with a focus on public K-12 schools and technical college systems.  Michael Kadow, an architect employed with the firm since 1985 became president of Somerville and Jack was appointed Chairman of the Board. In 2008, Somerville’s employees purchased the last remaining privately held shares of stock and became a 100% employee-owned firm. 

2010s

In 2010, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) was gaining ground nationally and Somerville designed the Nation’s first primary school to achieve LEED Gold Certification. Somerville’s diverse portfolio of projects continued, designing a new private high school in Miami, Florida, a world-class Automobile Gallery in downtown Green Bay, as well as a full renovation of the stadium suites and pre-function spaces at Lambeau Field. Today, Somerville continues to work on many high-profile projects in our community. We pride ourselves on having a 94% repeat client rate and attribute that to our firm’s rich history and commitment to helping our clients achieve success in their business.

1940s

The story of Somerville Architects and Engineers begins with a call to war, World War II, where John E. Somerville was put to task on war plant design and construction.  His facility experience in both engineering and architectural disciplines spanned the United States. This and his pre-war experience with another local architectural firm led to the opening of his own practice at 230 E. Walnut St., Green Bay, Wisconsin in May of 1946. As Frankie Carle and his Orchestra played “Oh! What It Seemed to Be,” the new focus seemed to be on industry. And with that, Somerville started its project log with the Great Lakes Shoe Company of Oconto, Wisconsin. 

1950s

Through the 1950s Somerville gained a foothold in the industrial market and was commissioned to design the Green Bay Box Company’s plant on Doblin St. and Paper Converting’s initial office and plant on South Ashland St.  In 1955, Somerville was retained by the City of Green Bay to design City Stadium, now Lambeau Field.  And by 1959 the Veteran’s Memorial Arena was added to their portfolio.

1960s

The ’60s started off with Elvis Presley and “It’s Now or Never” atop the billboard charts.  Post World War II, the nation saw an increased need for domestic production capacity.  This trend attributed to the firm’s share of industrial projects, at nearly 75% of the total workload.  Some notable clients of the time were UW Oshkosh, Green Bay Tissue Mills, Bellin Memorial Hospital, and Green Bay Schools.  This decade also saw the addition of John Somerville’s son, Jack, to the firm.

1970s

During the 70s the client base doubled with the addition of new clients and continued loyalty from existing clients.  January 1, 1973, the firm moved into the 2020 Riverside Drive building, which was one of Somerville’s own real estate developments.  Twenty-two days later, US President Richard Nixon announced “peace with honour” in Vietnam.  This decade also saw the introduction of a very noisy computer console in Somerville’s office which had a room of its own. 

1980s

The early 1980s brought about a significant organizational change. Dick Griese became president and Joh. E. Somerville became Chairman of the Board. The ’80s also saw the formation of the Mill Division which was established to serve Somerville’s growing list of industrial clients. The number of commissions in this decade was over 1,200 – compared to that of 355 in the ’60s and 725 in the ’70s. Overall Somerville’s practice had now become very broad, having a diverse portfolio designing many kinds of buildings.  It was also during this time that Somerville adapted CADD and virtually all working drawings were CADD printouts by the end of the ’80s.

1990s

As Guns n’ “Roses Sweet Child O’ Mine” topped the charts entering the ’90s, it was then that John E. Somerville entered into retirement and his son, John “Jack” Somerville became president of the firm. The 1990s brought the sharpest growth in both commissions and staff in the firm’s history. This growth compelled Somerville’s leadership to seek larger quarters, and so the firm moved just a few hundred feet south of the 2020 location to our current office at 2100 Riverside Drive.  Work through the ’90s remained strong in healthcare facilities and industrial design.

2000s

The events on September 11, 2001 shook our nation and the 2007/2008 recession brought difficult times for much of our industry. However, Somerville’s strong client relationships remained whole and the firm’s workload continued to grow. Our list of education clients and projects grew rapidly with a focus on public K-12 schools and technical college system.  Michael Kadow, an Architect employed with the firm since 1985 became president of Somerville and Jack was appointed Chairman of the Board. In 2008, Somerville’s employees purchased the last remaining privately held shares of stock and became a 100% employee-owned firm. 

2010s

In 2010, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) was gaining ground nationally and Somerville designed the Nation’s first primary school to achieve LEED Gold Certification. Somerville’s diverse portfolio of projects continued, designing a new private high school in Miami, Florida, a world-class Automobile Gallery in downtown Green Bay, as well as a full renovation of the stadium suites and pre-function spaces at Lambeau Field. Today, Somerville continues to work on many high-profile projects in our community. We pride ourselves on having a 94% repeat client rate and attribute that to our firm’s rich history and commitment to helping our clients achieve success in their business.

meet somerville architects & engineers

Get to know the people behind the projects, as well as the pride and purpose behind our firm. Find out what makes Somerville a special place to work. Learn why our average employee tenure is over 13 years. Understand why our associates love to work within our generalist firm with abundant opportunities. And hear why we love to call Northeast Wisconsin home. See for yourself the passion that drives us forward and keeps us smiling along the way.

meet the
team

At Somerville, we believe that design matters, not only for building systems and structures, but also in the assembly of our team. Our innovative, engaging, and creative projects begin with our outstanding staff. The idea “design matters” starts with a strong employee foundation, and a belief that each employee you interact with matters to you and your project.

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<strong>Karen Czechanski</strong> <br/> Office Manager / Human Resources

Karen Czechanski
Office Manager / Human Resources

Name - Karen Czechanski

<strong>Neil Yunk</strong> <br/>Architect

Neil Yunk
Architect

Name - Neil Yunk

<strong>Chuck Wischow</strong> </br> Associate / Project Manager

Chuck Wischow
Associate / Project Manager

Name - Chuck Wischow

<strong>Dan Wiitanen</strong> <br/> Associate / Project Architect

Dan Wiitanen
Associate / Project Architect

Name - Dan Wiitanen

<strong>Nancy Widi</strong> <br/>Senior Interior Designer

Nancy Widi
Senior Interior Designer

Name - Nancy Widi

<strong>Tamarine Wessing</strong> <br/> Architectural Designer

Tamarine Wessing
Architectural Designer

Name - Tamarine Wessing

<strong>Troy Theis</strong> <br/> Designer of Electrical Engineering Systems

Troy Theis
Designer of Electrical Engineering Systems

Name - Troy Theis

<strong>Tracy B. Strehlow</strong> <br/> Senior Project Coordinator

Tracy B. Strehlow
Senior Project Coordinator

Name - Tracy B. Strehlow

<strong>Rustin Schwandt</strong> <br/> Architect

Rustin Schwandt
Architect

Name - Rustin Schwandt

<strong>Robert M. Schunke</strong> <br/>Senior Architectural Designer

Robert M. Schunke
Senior Architectural Designer

Name - Robert M. Schunke

<strong>Matthew J. Schachtner</strong> <br/> Executive Vice President / Principal Project Architect

Matthew J. Schachtner
Executive Vice President / Principal Project Architect

Name - Matthew J. Schachtner

<strong>Anders Sandli</strong> <br/>Project Architect

Anders Sandli
Project Architect

Name - Anders Sandli

<strong>Kristy Pigeon</strong> <br/> Marketing Coordinator

Kristy Pigeon
Marketing Coordinator

Name - Kristy Pigeon

<strong>Kirsten Martin</strong><br/> Interior Designer

Kirsten Martin
Interior Designer

Name - Kirsten Martin

<strong>Melanie Parma</strong> <br/>Education Studio Leader / Senior Project Manager

Melanie Parma
Education Studio Leader / Senior Project Manager

Name - Melanie Parma

<strong>John Oates</strong> <br/>Vice President / Senior Project Architect

John Oates
Vice President / Senior Project Architect

Name - John Oates

<strong>Heather Nohr-Valley
</strong><br/>Director of Marketing and Branding

Heather Nohr-Valley

Director of Marketing and Branding

Name - Heather Nohr

<strong>Dave Neuville</strong> <br/>Associate / Senior Designer of Mechanical 
Engineering

Dave Neuville
Associate / Senior Designer of Mechanical 
Engineering

Name - Dave Neuville

<strong>Stacy J. Mosher</strong> <br/> Senior Mechanical / Electrical Drafter

Stacy J. Mosher
Senior Mechanical / Electrical Drafter

Name - Stacy J. Mosher

<strong>Lillian Mendez</strong> <br/> Project Architect / Specifications Writer

Lillian Mendez
Project Architect / Specifications Writer

Name - Lillian Mendez

<strong>Alex McEathron</strong><br/>Architectural Designer

Alex McEathron
Architectural Designer

Name - Alex McEathron

<strong>Lori Lemmen</strong><br/>Project Coordinator

Lori Lemmen
Project Coordinator

Name - Lori Lemmen

<strong>Sara Kvitek</strong> <br/>Vice President of Finance

Sara Kvitek
Vice President of Finance

Name - Sara Kvitek

<strong>Todd Kane</strong> <br/>Senior Architectural Designer

Todd Kane
Senior Architectural Designer

Name - Todd Kane

<strong>Michael Kadow</strong> <br/> President / Principal Project Architect

Michael Kadow
President / Principal Project Architect

Name - Michael Kadow

<strong>Matt Honold</strong> <br/>Architect

Matt Honold
Architect

Name - Matt Honold

<strong>Cathy Hendricks</strong> <br/> Business Development

Cathy Hendricks
Business Development

Name - Cathy Hendricks

<strong>Lila Harkoff</strong> <br/>Corporate Administrative Assistant

Lila Harkoff
Corporate Administrative Assistant

Name - Lila Harkoff

<strong>Bob Hardy</strong> <br/> Senior Mechanical Project Engineer

Bob Hardy
Senior Mechanical Project Engineer

Name - Bob Hardy

<strong>Matt Hale</strong><br/>Senior Architectural Designer

Matt Hale
Senior Architectural Designer

Name - Matt Hale

<strong>Jason D. Hale</strong> <br/>Project Architect

Jason D. Hale
Project Architect

Name - Jason D. Hale

<strong>Duane Grove</strong> <br/>Project Architect

Duane Grove
Project Architect

Name - Duane Grove

<strong>Travis Grell</strong> <br/>Designer of Mechanical Engineering Systems

Travis Grell
Designer of Mechanical Engineering Systems

Name - Travis Grell

<strong>Sam Graner</strong><br/>Mechanical Project Engineer

Sam Graner
Mechanical Project Engineer

Name - Sam Graner

<strong>Adam Drefcinski</strong> <br/>Associate / Project Manager

Adam Drefcinski
Associate / Project Manager

Name - Adam Drefcinski

<strong>Sheila Downing</strong> <br/>Associate / Senior Designer of Plumbing Engineering Systems

Sheila Downing
Associate / Senior Designer of Plumbing Engineering Systems

Name - Sheila Downing

<strong>Andrew M. DeGrave</strong><br/>Senior Mechanical Drafter

Andrew M. DeGrave
Senior Mechanical Drafter

Name - Andrew M. DeGrave

<strong>Charlie Cope</strong> <br/>Senior Mechanical Drafter

Charlie Cope
Senior Mechanical Drafter

Name - Charlie Cope

<strong>Timothy Bostedt </strong><br/>Associate / Project Manager

Timothy Bostedt
Associate / Project Manager

Name - Timothy Bostedt

<strong>Aaron Baumgartner</strong><br/> Mechanical Project Engineer

Aaron Baumgartner
Mechanical Project Engineer

Name - Aaron Baumgartner

<strong>Collin Arndt</strong><br/>Architectural Drafter

Collin Arndt
Architectural Drafter

Name - Collin Arndt

<strong>Jay R. Vincent</strong><br/>Director of Operations / Principal Project Manager

Jay R. Vincent
Director of Operations / Principal Project Manager

Name - Jay R. Vincent